Two full papers accepted to Learning @ Scale 2018

Two of my submissions to Learning @ Scale 2018 have been accepted. The papers are:

  • “Toward CS1 at Scale: Building and Testing a MOOC-for-Credit Candidate”, a paper about our first year of results from our online version of CS1301.
  • “Squeezing the Limeade: Policies and Workflows for Scalable Online Degrees”, a paper about our work cataloging the different approaches classes in the OMSCS take to delivering at scale.

To see the abstracts for these papers, keep reading after the jump.

Continue reading Two full papers accepted to Learning @ Scale 2018

I’ve won the Georgia Tech Curriculum Innovation Award for 2018!

Today, I received Georgia Tech’s 2018 Curriculum Innovation Award, presented by the Center for Teaching & Learning. The award is based on my work in developing active learning in CS1301: Introduction to Computing; scaling project-based learning in a large online course in CS6460: Educational Technology; and creating maintainable and revisable video content in CS6750: Human-Computer Interaction. My nomination packet is available here. Thanks, Georgia Tech and CTL!

Presenting at Georgia Tech’s CTL Workshop

On April 16th, 2018, I will be presenting a workshop with Gabriel Perez Irizarry for Georgia Tech’s Center for Teaching & Learning. The workshop, titled “Leveraging Peer Review to Support and Enhance Learning at Scale“, focuses on our use of peer-to-peer review in our OMSCS program to improve student community and engagement.

The slides for this talk are available here.

Presenting at the Hasso-Plattner Institut’s MOOC Symposium

On April 16th, 2018, I will be presenting at the Hasso-Plattner Institut’s 2018 MOOC Symposium in New York. My talk, titled “Understanding the Relationship between MOOC Viewing Behavior and Completion Rates”, covers the work we have done at Georgia Tech as well as work from other researchers on how viewing behaviors predict student success.

The slides for this talk are available here.

Two short papers accepted to AI in Education 2018

Two of my papers to AI in Education 2018 have been accepted. The papers are:

  • “Intelligent Evaluation and Feedback in Support of a Credit-Bearing MOOC”, a paper on the use of artificial intelligence in support of our CS1301 MOOC.
  • “Sentiment Analysis of Student Evaluations of teaching”, co-authored with Heather Newman, a paper on evaluating student sentiments in class reviews on OMSCentral.com and other sources.

For the abstracts for these papers, keep reading after the jump.

Continue reading Two short papers accepted to AI in Education 2018

Keynote and Workshops at Augusta University’s Experiential Learning Week

On March 13th, 2018, I will be presenting a keynote and three workshops for Augusta University’s Experiential Learning Week. The keynote, titled “Providing Experiential Learning Opportunities to Online Students”, focuses on my CS6460: Educational Technology class and its mechanisms for letting students pursue authentic, personally fulfilling projects at scale. The slides for the keynote are available here.

The three workshops are:

  • CS1301 Online — A Fresh Freshman Experience, covering our experience running an online version of a freshman-level CS1 class for on-campus students. The slides for this workshop are available here.
  • Course Design & Production, covering the production process behind creating a strong online course. The slides for this workshop are available here.
  • Learning at Scale, covering the various mechanisms and policies that go into administering an online program. The slides for this workshop are available here.

Presenting at SEEDS III

On February 27th, 2018, I will be presenting at the Southeast Educational Data Symposium (SEEDS). My talk, “Analysis of Forum Discourse in Large Online Classes“, examines a collection of projects performed by students and researchers evaluating the forum interactions in Georgia Tech’s OMSCS program. Among the projects featured are:

  • The Design & Intelligence Lab’s work on Jill Watson for CS7637 and Noelle King for CS1301
  • Sohyun Sung’s and Sandra Davis’s work on gender and social dynamics as they relate to online forum interactions
  • Damian Durruty’s and Michael Schubert’s work on evaluating student sentiment in large online classes
  • Nate Payne’s, Daniel Hegberg’s, and Mason Gallo’s work on predicting student success in part based on forum participation

The slides for the talk can be found here.

Presenting at the SPLICE 2018 Workshop

On February 21st, 2018, I will be presenting at the Standards, Protocols, and learning Infrastructure for Computing Education (SPLICE) 2018 workshop in Baltimore, Maryland. My talk focuses on the student experience and data analysis opportunities that arise when delivering a course via somewhat loosely-integrated platform, such as edX, Vocareum, Canvas, and McGraw-Hill’s Smartbook.

The slides for this talk can be found here.

Chapter accepted for volume on blended learning

I’ve written a chapter for Georgia Tech’s forthcoming Blended Learning in Practice, published by MIT Press and co-edited by Amanda Madden, Lauren Margulieux, Rob Kadel, and Ashok Goel.

My chapter, “Building Purposeful Online Learning: Outcomes from Blending CS1”, describes the components of my online CS1301 class that created a blended experience for on-campus students, including the recitations and help desk. Its focus is on how blending exists not just at the curricular level, but also at the student level: an online class delivered to a group of on-campus students with shared resources close proximity to one another is different from an online course delivered to a geographically distributed audience.

The book is expected out in March 2019.