Full paper accepted to 2019 ACM Learning @ Scale conference

A paper I co-authored with Charles Isbell has been paper accepted to the 2019 Learning @ Scale conference. The paper, titled “Master’s at Scale: Five Years in a Scalable Online Graduate Degree”, looks at the enrollment and demographic trends over the first several years of the OMSCS program. I’ll present the the paper at the Learning @ Scale conference on June 24 and 25 in Chicago.

The abstract and paper are available here.

Two full papers accepted for ACM CompEd 2019

Two of our papers have been accepted for the inaugural ACM Global Computing Education conference, to be held in May in Chengdu, Sichuan, China.

The first paper, “Five Years of Graduate CS Education Online and at Scale“, is co-authored with Charles Isbell, Thad Starner, and Ashok Goel. The paper shares the history of the OMSCS program teleologically divided into three phases: creation, experimentation, and normalization. The paper then describes the ways in which CS faculty and students contributed to its success by being able to build the things the program needed to succeed.

The second paper, “Replicating and Unraveling Performance and Behavioral Differences between an Online and a Traditional CS Course“, is co-authored with Melinda McDaniel. The paper attempts to replicates the results of our previous paper, Toward CS1 at Scale: Building and Testing a MOOC-for-Credit Candidate, and delves deeper into the mechanisms that give rise to its findings.

For the abstract and full paper, see the linked pages above.

Two full papers accepted to ACM CompEd 2019

Today, we were notified that we had two papers accepted to the ACM’s new computer education conference CompEd for 2019, located in Chengdu, China. The two papers are:

  • “Five Years of Graduate CS Education Online and at Scale”, by myself, Charles Isbell, Thad Starner, and Ashok Goel. The paper looks at the OMSCS program, with a special focus on how the computer science subject matter uniquely intersects with the program’s scale.
  • “Replicating and Unraveling Performance and Behavioral Differences between an Online and a Traditional CS Course”, by myself and Melinda McDaniel. The paper looks at Georgia Tech’s CS1301 and compares students’ performance, attitudes, and motivations between online and in-person versions.

To see the abstracts for these papers, keep reading after the jump.

Continue reading Two full papers accepted to ACM CompEd 2019

Book chapter published in Springer volume

I’ve published a chapter in the Springer volume Designing for the User Experience in Learning Systems.

Titled “The CHI of Teaching Online: Blurring the Lines Between User Interfaces and Learning Interfaces”, the chapter explores the design of an online classroom through the lens of human-computer interaction, applying common design principles to the ideas like how information is pushed to students and how access to different audiences is managed.

For more information on the chapter, see its dedicated page.

Two full papers accepted to SIGCSE 2019

We’ve had two submissions accepted to SIGCSE 2019! The papers are:

  • “From Clusters to Content: Using Code Clustering for Course Improvement”, by myself, Ryan Arrison, Mehnaz Ruksana, Evi Salguero, Zida Wang, Ben Wellington, and Kevin Yin. This paper looks at using code clustering (automated grouping of students’ code submissions) to inform curricular revisions.
  • “Collaboration versus Cheating: Reducing Code Plagiarism in an Online MS Computer Science Program”, by Tony Mason, Ada Gavrilovska, and myself. This paper looks at detecting and deterring cheating in programming assignments.

To see the abstracts for these papers, keep reading after the jump.

Continue reading Two full papers accepted to SIGCSE 2019

NSF EAGER Grant received to research behavioral and physiological feedback online

Lauren Wilcox (PI), Betsy DiSalvo (Co-PI), Thomas Ploetz (Co-PI), and I (Co-PI) have received an NSF EAGER grant to research using behavioral and physiological feedback to tailor online course experiences to the individual’s needs. The grant, titled “Leveraging Behavioral and Physiological Feedback in the Design of Affect-Sensitive Distance Learning”, will run for two years for $300,000.

Mozilla Research gift to research virtual reality in online education

We have received a Mozilla Research gift of $45,000 to research the use of virtual reality in online education. Specifically, this grant will focus on content-agnostic applications of virtual reality, such as virtual lecture-watching parties, office hours, student lounges, and poster sessions. The goal is to find applications of virtual reality that can span across classes and levels, rather than specific applications to certain content areas.