Two papers accepted to Learning with MOOCs 2019

Two papers I helped write have been accepted to Learning with MOOCs 2019.

The first, “Annotation-free Automatic Examination Essay Feedback Generation“, is co-authored by Filipe Altoe. The paper looks at the design of a system to give automated feedback on essays by extracting concept maps and comparing them to an exemplary solution.

The second, “Surveying the MOOC Data Set Universe“, is co-authored by James Lohse and Christine McManus. The paper looks at the relatively closed ecosystem around MOOC data sets and issues a call to recommit to open access to data.

The papers will be presented at the conference in Milwaukee. More information can be found on their dedicated pages linked above.

Chapter published in USG Essays on Best Practices

As part of winning the 2019 USG Regents’ Teaching Excellence Award for Online Teaching, I was invited to write an essay for the USG’s faculty development book Engaged Student Learning: Essays on Best Practices in the University System of Georgia.

The article is now available in the published book. Titled “Creating Cadence: Fostering Persistent Engagement in Asynchronous Online Courses”, the essay focuses on the ways in which an asynchronous class can nonetheless develop the passive and natural sense of routine and structure that is implicitly present in many on-campus classes due to a synchronous schedule.

The full chapter can be seen at its dedicated page.

Synchronous at Scale: Investigation and Implementation of a Semi-Synchronous Online Lecture Platform

Kutnick, D. & Joyner, D. A. (2019). Synchronous at Scale: Investigation and Implementation of a Semi-Synchronous Online Lecture Platform. In Proceedings of the Sixth Annual ACM Conference on Learning at Scale. Chicago, Illinois, USA.

Continue reading Synchronous at Scale: Investigation and Implementation of a Semi-Synchronous Online Lecture Platform

Journal article published in Online Learning

A journal article co-authored by Chaohua Ou, Ashok Goel, and me has been published in the 23rd volume of the journal Online Learning. Titled “Designing and Developing Video Lessons for Online Learning: A Seven-Principle Model”, the article provides a seven-principle model for creating video lessons in online courses, including methods for learning (learning by example, learning by doing, adaptive feedback, and learning through reflection), ideas for instructional sequencing, and guidelines for content presentation.

For the abstract and full paper, see its dedicated page.

Replicating and Unraveling Performance and Behavioral Differences between an Online and a Traditional CS Course

Joyner, D. A. & McDaniel, M. (2019). Replicating and Unraveling Performance and Behavioral Differences between an Online and a Traditional CS Course. In Proceedings of the ACM Global Computing Education Conference (CompEd). Chengdu, China. ACM Press.

Continue reading Replicating and Unraveling Performance and Behavioral Differences between an Online and a Traditional CS Course